Friday, September 16, 2005

an INTRODUCTION (and the wanna' be bible)

so, if i were really writing a blog, i'd have something witty to say. some hooker to draw you in. a clever analogy or personal antidote. or maybe you might just like me, and to humor me, you say 'yeah, andrew, i'd love to be the 1 person to read your blog this year.' actually, i tend to edge my way off the sidewalk and into traffic when i see hookers. apparently it takes someone of quite strong character to walk freely and unihibited in hookerland. the judgmental phobiacs teeter on sidewalk cornices, risking automobile rub, while the sexually enthusiastic leer or creep into the waiting arms of wantonness. okay, besides quaffing a gallon of verbosity juice, i'm also stretching the truth a bit. i doubt that i really alter my course perceptibly, but my steps might fall a shade quicker as i tunnel away. in any case, i hope that my blog won't cater to any particular sidewalk style. almost all are welcome here. doesn't that make you feel warm and fuzzy?

ummmm...so, today at work i was faced with the intriguing dilemna of numbers. Is it three chickens or 3 chickens? perhaps one of the more pressing questions of science. that is, when submitting a manuscript to the archives of neurology, do you spell out 'three' or leave it in numerical form? After a frustrating google search, I visited our delightful VA librarian (ex-technical writer, ex-Navy recruit, ex-Nepal peace corp vet) to acquire the bible of scientific writing: the AMA Manual of Style.

Christmas list:

One manual of style, 1 ipod, and 1 piano

7 comments:

Beth said...

do you mean "anecdote," or do you really believe a blog should in some way nuetralize or counteract the boredom and meaninglessness in the lives of its readers?
in any case, I think I knew that about numbers: I learned to spell out anything ten or over, and to use the numerical character for 1-9, unless at the beginning of a sentence. Which you demonstrated perfectly in your Christmas list. Good list, by the way.

andrew said...

good points beth. my apples are getting cold, so i'll reply in a later blog.

beth said...

woops, I accidentally put this comment on the photo... anyway:
Here's something that's now on MY christmas list... http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/2005/005/14.42.html

andrew said...

interesting. i wouldn't have expected a literary review on chistianity today. that's kinda' cool. perhaps there's (literary) hope for us conservative evangelicals.

in any case, i'm not sure which bundle(s) of eliotan joy you're specifically adding to the list. but what an odd duck - who puts literary reviews on their christmas list.

:)

andrew said...

beth in reply to your initial comment, i indeed meant to say 'anecdote.' that particular post was already running a bit past deadline, so i apparently didn't have the opportunity to fully edit the content. we at the 17 point scale take grammar quite seriously, so we welcome any and all input. however, despite your fine catch, we have left the original content unaltered. after all, as you nearly suggest, the error may be more telling than the intended content. consider our freudian slip an unheralded & unconventional unveiling of our mission statement. the 17 point scale endeavors to step into the vast sea of blogs as an antidote to the ennui of our postmodern world.

beth said...

beautiful mission statement. Yes, Christianity Today publishes a sub-magazine & email newsletter called "books & culture" that is indeed very literary, and very good reading in general. (little tidbit: Lauren Winner occasionally writes for it.) actually, Image Update takes Books & Culture as a bit of an example, I think. oh! the book I wanted is "the annotated wasteland." read the review...it's good. i *heart* ts eliot.

andrew said...

does it strike you as a bit bsish? i hope not.

i'd like to reiterate that i'm quite encouraged by christianity today. funny that when layfolk think of christian writing they think only of doomsday lit, but really there's an entire industry of thinking-mans christian reading out there.

i thought that the wasteland was your least favorite poem by eliot.